Lime coat removal

Some readers have expressed curiousity about why we’re removing the plaster top coat. I started with the kitchen walls which were heavily damaged by water leaking from the back roof and a burst second floor supply pipe that had run unchecked for months. It was uggggly! The lime coat was compromised in many spots and delaminated easily. Attracted to surfaces with a rich patina , I wasn’t surprised when I fell in love with the color and texture of the original ‘brown’ coat, the second layer of the original three part process.

One thing leads to another and I pushed the look into the middle room on the wall that connects to the kitchen. Since the new kitchen will straddle both rooms, it made sense.

          

Then came the hall and stairwell…


I had the desire to get into it but held off, uncertain of the final look and aware of the work it would involve.  Alas, Sam’s gentle nudging and thinly concealed excitement got the best of me and scrape! scrape! scrape! Off came the lime coat!! Normally the lime coat doesn’t release this easily, and in places it didn’t. But lucky for us, the mechanical bond was possibly compromised due to the original plasterers allowing too much dry time between the ‘brown’ coat and the final lime coat.

wall detail showing some of the past repairs where the lime coat delaminated

To seal the surfaces, first I’ll sand and wire brush them, then experiment with a thinned down water-based varnish or a brick/masonry sealer.  

I’m not certain of the outcome but trust there’ll be a satisfying solution juxtaposing very finished details against the rawness of the walls…. stay tuned!

Richter or the 5K house?

About mdejong11

Residential contractor/artist
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2 Responses to Lime coat removal

  1. michael says:

    Tear out the kitchen closet! Get rid of it! The two rooms must be open to one another on each side except for that wonderful mass in the center!

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