The Artists.

It was an honor to have some of my favorite artists here in Cincinnati show in the 5K house. Thanks to those who made it to the big opening January 19th and the ‘open house/gallery’ viewings the following three Saturdays.

Jay Bolotin

Jay Bolotin

Bill Renshler

Bill Renschler.

Joe Winterhalter

Joseph Winterhalter.

Tim McMichael

Tim McMichael

Jim Williams.

Jim Williams.

Chris Voorhes.

Chris Vorhees.

Tim McMichael.

Tim McMichael.

Don Kelley.

Don Kelley.

Don Kelley.

Don Kelley.

Denise Burge

Denise Burge.

Anthony Luesman

Anthony Luensman.

Anthony Luesman

Anthony Luensman.

Paige Williams

Paige Williams.

Paige Williams

Paige Williams.

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That’s right… salad bowls.

soon enough you’ll find why I titled this post as I did.

But first…

There’s work to do!

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Houses from this period and style typically had fancy metal work on top; it’s called the ‘cornice’.  About four years ago it fell off the 5k house. Above the side porch you can see some of the lost original detail.

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My brother Robbert helped me with this project. First we removed most of the existing tin, shored-up the existing framing and started anew.

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One of the challenges was marrying the existing tin and framing, which sagged in the middle, with the our work.

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So we built it back using wood and…

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You guessed it! I came across them at the near-by scrap yard. Perfect.

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I was so happy to get this done. We started in December when the weather can be if-y but it went in our favor.

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15kcincinnati.com?

Very tempting…

I’m gearing up to find another project so my ears perked up when I heard about a cheap property in one of my favorite Cincinnati neighborhoods – Northside.

It still blows me away that places can be this cheap and, unbelievably, I’m not interested in buying it. The timing, scope and character of the place tells me to hold off.

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It was a bar for many years; the brick wall facing the green house has a sign offering food and drink.

Abe.

Abe showed me the place. He’s the pastor of the church that owns the place. Very nice guy.

The first floor.

The first floor.

The second floor.

The second floor.

The third floor.

The third floor.

Anyone interested? I did consider buying and holding onto it but I know myself well enough… I need to wait for a better fit.

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The Subway Tiles.

I’ll find elements in the demolition and reconstruction process I like and want to keep.  I keep them in the back of the mind until a solution pops up; sometimes by playing around with ideas, the answer will come. Discovering the tiles was a wonderful surprise.

I’ve always enjoyed ‘before/after’ photos and wanted to show some from when I first got the house .

Presently the first floor has a small half bathroom where the previous one existed. Here’s what I found and how it got put back together:

In the beginning.... Here's the kitchen on the back of the house.The small room on the left was the old bathroom probably put there in the 1930's when the house was split into a two family, very common during the depression.

In The Beginning… here’s the kitchen on the back of the house. The small room on the left was the old bathroom probably put there in the 1930’s when the house was split into a two-family; very common during the depression.

You can just see the subway tiles

Beyond the left door jam, you can just see the subway tiles.

These tiles were completely covered by sheets of dense paper board with printed tiles. All the Kitchen walls had it as well.

They were completely covered by sheets of dense paper board with printed faux tiles.

Here's what I believe happened: House was built in 1895 with no kitchen. Probably in 1910 a sink was mounted on these backsplash tiles. You can see a bunch of patched in holes.

Here’s what I believe happened: the house was built without water in the kitchen, then around 1910 a sink was added and mounted onto these tiles. They all had some manufactering blemishes hence I believe they were ‘seconds’. As you’ll see, I removed about half the tiles, some were loose, others were damaged, and it worked out for the best end result.

On the ceiling you can see the outline of the old bathroom wall. The doorway and wall on the left was removed to tie the two rooms together.

On the ceiling you can see the outline of the old bathroom. The doorway and wall on the left was removed to tie the two rooms together; now, the kitchen bridges them together.

We've come a looooong way!

We’ve come a looooong way!

A detail of the finish

A detail of the finished bathroom.

So here's what I used: bead board from a friend who demo-ed a basement bathroom. I used my hand power planer to remove the paint.

I used beadboard from a friend who demoed a basement bathroom. I used a hand-held power planer to remove the surface paint, leaving behind a pin-stripped look.

things cleaned up.

All the new walls are smooth and painted white. The exterior walls have the exposed ‘brown’ coat rich with the history of repairs.

Kitchen  small bath, hutch

kitchen – small bath – hutch

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The kitchen

I love Ikea kitchens.

Love the engineering. Love the price. Love having a store in Cincinnati. As for the last point, here’s why: generally I’ll need 3-4 trips to get it right, it’d be very frustrating being close enough to drive – yet still a ways off – like being in Columbus (two hours away). Lucky us.

On the subject of love, I’m constantly enthralled by the integrity of the materials used and the craftsmanship seen in old houses. Also I enjoy the challenge of working within their given limitations. For a contrast I prefer furniture and kitchens to have a modern look.

These photos show the kitchen from different angles:

kitchen

kitchen - 2

kitchen - 3

I have a love/hate relationship with upper cabinets. Overall I don't like how they close in a space, but damn they're functional! Just try to keep 'em to a minimum. Had the height to play around in the Modriaan style - sans color.

I have a love/hate relationship with upper cabinets. Overall I don’t like how they close in a space, but damn they’re functional! Just try to keep ’em to a minimum. Had the height to play around in the Mondrian style – sans color.

The Countertops are from an art classroom form a local school that was recently demolished. I filled in any nicks with epoxy, like the carved-in letter 'm'. The shelves in the pantry closet are also from the school.

The countertops are salvaged from a recently demolished Junior high school. I filled in nicks with epoxy, like the carved out letter ‘M’, seen here. The wooden shelves in the pantry closet come from the school as well.

I’ve been amazed by the play of light in this house… it keeps surprising me.  Here the sunshine is bouncing off the living room floor:

kitchen - 5

kitchen - 6

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Positive and Negative

Together at last…

The positive pattern is up the stairwell from the negative shape

The positive pattern is up the stairwell from the negative one.

Here's the pattern with the negative shape.

Here’s the pattern with the negative shape.

The patterns were stored outside causing the wood to swell up and pull apart. After sanding this gave This gives

The patterns were stored outside prior to me getting them, this caused the wood to swell and pull apart. I like the lines created by the exposure and revealed by sanding the weathered patina off.

Another shot...

Often the simple pattern shapes remind me of Martin Puryears’ work.

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Thanks Oscar…

The great Brazilian architect, Oscar Niemeyer, Passed away Yesterday.

Walking in or around his work felt like being in a live ‘Jetsons’ set. Concrete looks as malleable and weightless as paper. Just beautiful.
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grab bag - 33

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